Burberry Makers House Review

The Art of Making

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Burberry’s celebration of Henry Moore provided the unique opportunity to learn skills and techniques from Hole & Corner’s selection of makers
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As part of the weeklong celebration of the new Burberry collection and the artist who influenced it, Henry Moore: Inspiration & Process included some of Moore’s most iconic sculptures together with his sketches, working models and maquettes. Hole & Corner were proud to partner with Burberry in running a series of related workshops throughout the week alongside the exhibition at the Makers House (on the site of the old Foyle’s bookshop on Manette Street, off London’s Charing Cross Road). 

Taking inspiration from Moore’s studios at Perry Green (home of the Henry Moore Foundation), we produced a programme of sold-out making demonstrations and classes, led by Olivia Bullock, Wooden + Woven and Forest + Found.

Alexander Devol specialises in homeware, kitchenware and artwork, sold through his brand Wooden + Woven (named simply because ‘the materials I find myself most at home with seem to always be wooden or woven’). For his workshop, Devol demonstrated the art of woodblock and linocut printing – techniques used extensively by Moore, as evidenced by the roomful of exhibition posters on show at Makers House. Participants were invited to produce their own designs or work with pre-cut patterns that Devol had prepared based on the artist’s own work.

Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, aka Forest + Found, taught an experimental maquette and object-making class, working with natural materials inspired by Moore. Using a mixture of wool fleece, yarn, willow and turned wooden formers, people produced a variety of sculptural pieces in differing scales. 

Finally, artist and illustrator Olivia Bullock demonstrated wax-resist watercolour painting – a technique invented by Moore that he used extensively throughout his career (and which has obvious parallels with the water resistant qualities of Gabardine, invented by Thomas Burberry in 1879). Workshop attendees were encouraged to draw designs using wax crayons and chinographs before applying a watercolour wash over the top.

Huge thanks to our fantastic makers, who each proved inspiring and inventive teachers, adding a unique interactive element to a truly fascinating show. The Makers House once again proved to be a hugely popular event, with Christopher Bailey’s Burberry designs (including a stunning collection of 78 couture capes, The Cap Reimagined) shown alongside one of the best Henry Moore exhibitions outside of Perry Green. With additional workshops by The Hepworth Wakefield and The New Craftsmen, it proved a stimulating week all round. Final thanks must of course go to the team at Burberry for putting on such a great event and inviting us to participate. 

Burberry Makers House

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Words Mark Hooper
Photographs Chloe Winstanley